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Face-off between 2 veteran Miami wrestlers – one drug kingpin, another DEA agent

Published On: 09-23-2016 in Category: Cocaine, Drugs

Miami-drug-war

Miami has reemerged as a cocaine trafficking hub in the recent months with a dramatic rise in the drug’s seizure and arrests related to it. The city has regained its notoriety as the center for cocaine trafficking, probably due to its peninsular geography.

During the cocaine cowboy era in the 1970s, when Miami was turning into America’s drug capital, two wrestling stars – Alex DeCubas and Kevin Pedersen of Palmetto High School – had witnessed life-changing experiences, which transformed them completely.

With a nerve of steel and tough resolve, the two wrestlers became champions during their school days, representing the institution’s squad to the state wrestling championship. As time passed, DeCubas became a cocaine trafficking kingpin, while Pedersen became an agent of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) in Miami, the same federal agency that was looking to knock down DeCubas.

In August 2016, an hour-long documentary was aired on ESPN channel, showcasing the life of the two wrestling stars. The documentary shed light on the lives of DeCubas and Pedersen, including a series of commentary from DeCubas’ family, friends and fellow smugglers. But the most surprising element of the short film was that it showed the renewed friendship of DeCubas and Pedersen, post the release of DeCubas from the prison.

Earlier, during the same month, a podcast was also telecast that covered incidents from the life of DeCubas following his extradition from Colombia to Miami in 2003. The story was also published in the Miami Herald’s Sunday magazine Tropic. Nearly 19 years ago, the magazine had covered the same details, but without the latest updates on DeCubas’ life post his extradition.

Two wrestling stars were poles apart during school

At the time when the cowboy era was gaining momentum in the city due to easy money and rising greed linked with drug trade, the two high school wrestling stars had a strong will and an urge to win all wrestling championships. They were senior co-captains who took wrestling to newer heights through their indomitable spirit and a nerve of steel. However, the two remained an unlikely pair and were poles apart in all other aspects.

While Pedersen was a shy, scrawny boy who had potential to win through rigorous training, DeCubas was a naturally gifted wrestler, whose fearless attitude and uncanny strength made him a heavyweight champion.

Surprisingly, the two individuals who grew up in similar environment of heroism on wrestling grounds treaded opposite paths. According to reports, Pedersen made all efforts to stay out of the investigation of his old teammate. And Pedersen still hopes that DeCubas would understand the reality one day and surrender himself to the DEA.

Leading a drug-free life

Drug trafficking has been a persisting problem in the U.S. and Miami is not an exception. If you or your loved one is grappling with an addiction to cocaine or any other drug, contact the Miami Drug Treatment and Rehab Center that will help you find one of the best addiction treatment programs customized to your needs. Call at our 24/7 helpline number 305-615-2028 or chat online for more information.

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